Department of Justice regulations on discrimination with a clothing retailer; Immigration assistance in the Senate?

Clothing company resolves federal discrimination charges against non-U.S. Employees

The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently announced that US retail company Gap has settled federal charges alleging discrimination against non-US employees based on their immigration status. Gap will pay a fine of $ 73,263 for the violations and pay back wages to employees who lost their jobs as a result, ending an investigation into the company’s conduct that lasted more than three years.

The Justice Department alleged that Gap contributed to discriminatory behavior by relying excessively on an electronic human resources management system and unnecessarily rechecking the permission of certain employees to work without any legal basis for doing so. Federal law prohibits employers from unnecessarily rechecking a worker’s authorization to work or from specifying the types of documents a worker is allowed to present to prove authorization to work, due to the risk of discrimination based on citizenship, immigration status or national origin of the worker. Employers should ensure that employees have the opportunity to present any documents permitted by law to prove their eligibility to work and that no employee is checked more than required by federal regulations.

Third federal immigration aid proposal belongs to Senate parliamentarian

Senate Democrats met again with MP Elizabeth MacDonough to advocate for the inclusion of temporary immigration protections in the $ 2.2 trillion reconciliation bill currently under consideration. Senate Republicans at the bipartisan meeting opposed the inclusion of the protections.

The new proposal contains provisions for budgetary purposes after the parliamentarian rejected two different proposals to allow millions of undocumented immigrants to apply for permanent residence. Senate Democrats are expected to present more permanent immigration reform measures in a subsequent proposal. Should this third measure fail, Senate Democrats will almost certainly face appeals from rights organizations to override the parliamentarian’s decision, which would require the support of the Senate’s 50 Democrats. Some advocates are already pushing the Senate to reinstate provisions that were deleted following the last two rejections.

Several groups, including the National Center for Immigration Law (NILC), released a memorandum last month detailing steps Senate Democrats could take to overturn the parliamentarian’s decision, should it become necessary. NILC Executive Director Marielena Hincapie said the group “urges Democrats to seize their own political power, ignore the parliamentarian’s advisory opinion and enact the continuing relief that millions of immigrants who call our country home, and that are essential to who we are as a nation, absolutely needed.

Afghan refugees find homes in New Jersey with help from New Jersey nonprofit

Welcome to Jersey City, a community-based non-profit organization that provides assistance to refugees and asylum seekers in the Jersey City area, has helped nine Afghan families find new homes in Jersey City. The organization hopes to help many more families relocate to the Jersey City area after thousands of Afghans fled the country after the Taliban regained control of the country earlier this year, with a large percentage of these people seeking refuge and protection in the United States. .

Many Afghan families – as well as refugees from all over the world – face challenges and difficulties settling in a whole new country: an Afghan, who had been resettled with the help of the US military. , described how difficult it was to find housing, enroll their children in school, get the necessary vaccines and complete other necessary paperwork. Welcome Home Jersey City’s mission is to help families overcome these challenges and connect families with other refugees.

© 2021 Norris McLaughlin PA, All rights reservedRevue nationale de droit, volume XI, number 337


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Anne G. Cash